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Improving your UI’s user flow: use these 5 top tools to make your user’s journey a walk in the park

Improving your UI’s user flow: use these 5 top tools to make your user’s journey a walk in the park

It’s your brand’s job to help users get to where they need to be on your site or app. That’s where user flow steps in.

Identifying your user flow encourages you to align your UI design and navigation with user goals. Optimizing your user flow and conversion funnel will improve your site’s success rate because it will enable users to accomplish their tasks – i.e. convert – as efficiently as possible.

Whether this is your first time designing user flow or you just need a recap, this is the place to be. Check out these 5 fantastic tools for mapping out user flow, plus some helpful tips on getting started.

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What is user flow?

A user flow is a path that the user travels – from entry point to end goal – in order to complete a task in a user interface. The entry point might be your site’s homepage and the end goal purchasing your product. The user flow defines all the navigation steps in the user journey in order to reach their goal.

Remember that each user flow relates to one user group, so if you have multiple target users, you’ll need to define a user flow for each of those groups.

According to Smashing Magazine, some common user flows include:

  • Paid advertising – a user coming from a banner or Google AdWords ad.
  • Social media – a user coming from a friend’s post on a social network.
  • Email – a user coming from an email newsletter or referral invitation.
  • Organic search – a user coming from a deep link that was surfaced by a search.
  • Press or news item – a user coming from a mention in the news or a blog post.

Download Justinmind now to start defining the ideal user flow

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5 must-know tools for creating your user flow

Create beautiful user flow diagrams with Timblee

Create visual, interactive workflows and sitemaps with Timblee mapping tool. It’s intuitive drag and drop canvas makes it quick and easy to create flow diagrams and is great for designers just getting started with user flow. Users can get deep into each page’s interaction by creating subpages.

Timblee also supports collaborative design with a comments and feedback system and versioning history.

Cons: the only thing we don’t love is the visibility issue with high-resolution screens, as some of the elements in the UI become unreadable.

Price-point: Try it free for 14 days. Pricing starts at $9/month.

Design and test your user flow with Justinmind prototyping tool

Justinmind is a wireframing and prototyping tool for web and mobile that enables users to design their user flow and visualize their conversion flow in context.

With usability testing tool integrations, a powerful scenario builder and requirements definition capabilities, users have a complete set of features for creating user flow.

Users can drag and drop elements to the canvas and view their progress in any browser or on any device throughout the design process. Users can even make their screen flow interactive with Justinmind’s Events system.

There are also teamwork, versioning review and comment features so working with your team is easy. And the best part? Justinmind is a desktop-based tool so no need to worry about internet connection or security, we’ve got you covered.

Cons: hmm…it’s too intuitive? You can get it free for 30 days? Ouch.

Price-point: Free for a 1 month. Pricing from $19/month from then on.

Build and store your user flow in the cloud with draw.io

Draw.io is a diagramming tool for creating flowcharts and defining user flow. Users can create their own charts, diagrams and flows or import readymade items with a URL.

The draw.io interface is well-designed and makes it easy for users to draft up diagrams. It support real-time collaboration and support when connected with Google. Diagrams are cloud-stored and users can choose from a number of cloud computing services, including Google Drive, OneDrive, GitHub, Dropbox and Trello. Draw.io is also optimized for widescreen monitor use, so working in high-resolution isn’t a problem.

Cons: the only snag is that you can’t customize its tools – but hey, it’s free!

Price-point: No registration or payment needed.

Create and share your user flow with Cacoo

Cacoo is a diagram and flow generating tool, integrated with Google Drive. The tool has a variety of readymade templates and shape libraries for creating flowcharts, mind maps, user flow and charts.

Cacoo has a built-in chat feature and supports Visio and Adobe Creative embedding and exporting. It’s ideal for designing flow diagram templates. It’s a cloud-based tool and users can share their work by copying the link provided.

Cons: the interface isn’t very intuitive and things aren’t where you’d expect them to be. But if you like the tool, give it a go!

Price-point: Try it free for 14 days. Pricing starts at $4.95/month.

Sketch out your user flow with Lucidchart

Lucidchart is an online tool for sketching and sharing flow diagrams. With different templates to choose from, it’s a tool for a variety of tasks, from brainstorming and defining user flow to project management and working with your team and stakeholders.

Lucidchart has a group chat and comments feature so working getting everyone up to speed is easy. The tool is responsive, built on HTML5 and web standards, and works with all major browsers and devices.

Cons: more variety of templates would make this tool even more powerful.

Price-point: Try it free for 7 days. Pricing starts at $8.95/month.

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How do you define user flow?

When you start to design a new website or mobile application, designers are often given a set of client requirements or high-level project objectives. As important as these attributes are to the project, it’s no substitute for designing with user needs in mind.

The first step to designing a user flow is to perform a round of usability testing. This will help you identify user goals and frustrations with current solutions so that you can try to amend in your design. It will also help you to determine who your target users are, using scenarios and personas. Read more on this here.

How to present user flow

Then, you should start to sketch out each user flow for each target user group. You can do this on paper, or if you’d prefer to go digital, why not try out Justinmind’s sketching UI kit. It’s got all the elements you need to sketch out your user flow, with the added bonus of making your future designs quicker to build up.

For each user flow you define, ask yourself the following questions to ensure that your flow is on the right track.

  • What does the user need to accomplish?
  • Are the steps in your user flow going to help them or discourage them from progressing?
  • Does the user have enough information to accomplish the task?

Once you’ve got a good idea of your user flows, you can start to map them to conversion funnels. Conversion funnels help to align user needs with business objectives, for value all-round.

Optimizing the conversion funnel is the key to making sure users convert and return to your brand. Visualizing the conversion flow in context will help you understand how best to guide your users.

So, the next step is building wireframes and prototypes and testing your conversion funnel out with real users. Try doing some A/B tests with different user flows to see what works best for different types of users and validate your conversion funnel.

Why you need to design user flow

In order for us to know what content to include in each screen of our web and mobile interfaces, we need to design the user flow. The user flow is the basis for designing and testing out experiences that meet user needs and help users achieve their goals.

How easily users are able to navigate your site largely affects your site’s success rate. By mapping your user flows, you can create a positive user experience by identifying how easy it is for users to reach their end goal and removing any roadblocks in their way.

Designing user flow: the takeaway

User flow is an important part of the user experience in any web or mobile UI. Neglect it and you’re on your way to frustrated users bouncing from your site and never returning. Pick a tool that helps you define your user flow from the very beginning of your design process and you can’t go wrong.

Justinmind is a great tool for designing user flow. It’s interactive and allows you to get on with the rest of the design process without having to switch tools! Download it now for free.download_free

Emily is Marketing Content Editor at Justinmind

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